Mealworms and cellular respiration lab report

First, we placed the worm inside the glass bottle. This served as our controlled experiment.

October 30, Cellular Respiration in Mealworms Energy is at the heart of life. Without energy, cells could not grow, transport materials, or maintain order.

In most organisms, this steady source of energy is provided by ATP or adenosine triphosphate, a molecule that consists of a nucleotide with three attached phosphate groups.

Cells produce ATP through a process known as cellular respiration. In this process, free energy is transferred from food molecules such as glucose into ATP molecules as glucose is gradually oxidized, releasing energy that is eventually used to attach inorganic phosphate groups to ADP molecules to produce ATP.

Cellular respiration consists of substrate-level phosphorylation during glycolysis and Krebs cycle, which occur in the cytoplasm and mitochondrial matrix respectively, and the much more energy-rich oxidative phosphorylation during the electron transport chain, occurring in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

Despite its complexity, cellular respiration can be summarized by the following simple chemical equation: Specifically, we decided to use a carbon dioxide probe to measure the rate at which two mealworms in a closed jar produce carbon dioxide. Since carbon dioxide is produced as a byproduct of cellular respiration, the change in carbon dioxide concentration over time can be used to measure the rate of cellular respiration of the mealworms.

We also decided to study the factors affecting the rate of respiration by asking, what effect, if any, does sound have on the change in CO2 concentrations in the jar with the two mealworms? We initially hypothesized that sound would increase the rate of respiration because higher sounds are likely to cause the mealworms to move around more, increasing the need for energy.

To begin testing our hypotheses, we took two mealworms and placed them in a large jar. We sealed the jar by inserting a Vernier carbon dioxide probe into the top opening.

We then connected the probe to the Vernier Graphical app. For the control case, we then let the jar sit for ten minutes, using Vernier Graphical to measure the carbon dioxide concentration in parts per minute over the ten minute duration.

Next, for the experimental cases, we again took the jar and placed two new, but identically sized mealworms we had to air out the first two and repeated the process of measuring carbon dioxide concentration over ten minutes.

But this time, we used another app to generate a high pitch noise, above the frequency that humans can hear, for the entire ten minutes, keeping the iPad close to the jar. Finally, we repeated the same procedure with two new, identically sized mealworms but played a low pitch noise within the human audible range for the entire ten minutes.

Pictures of the experimental setup — two mealworms in a jar with carbon dioxide probe. Graph showing carbon dioxide concentration ppm vs time for all three cases. Red — low pitch.

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Yellow — high pitch. In this graph, the blue line is the data from the control case, the red line is the low pitch trial, and the yellow line is the high pitch trial. From the graph, we can see that, in the control case, the carbon dioxide concentration increased from ppm to ppm, an increase of ppm.

For low pitch, the change in carbon dioxide concentration over the same interval was an increase by ppm, and finally for high pitch, the change in carbon dioxide was an increase of ppm. The data clearly shows that the increase in carbon dioxide concentration was greatest in the high pitch case and lowest in the control case.

This means that cellular respiration is occurring at a faster rate in the low pitch case and at the fastest rate in the high pitch case, since more carbon dioxide production means more moles of glucose are oxidized per unit time. Thus the data supports our hypothesis that sound increases the rate of cellular respiration by making the mealworms move around more because of discomfort.

It also makes sense that high pitch sounds increased cellular respiration more than low pitch sounds since high pitch sounds are more unpleasant than low pitch ones, leading to more motion as a result.

We also successfully determined the effect of at least one factor, sound, on the rate of cellular respiration. Some sources of error in this experiment, however, may include the fact that we used different mealworms in each trial, although we controlled for biomass by using identically sized mealworms each time.

For future research, we would definitely like to measure the impact of other factors, such as temperature or time of day, on cellular respiration using a similar method, and repeat the experiment on bigger, more complex organisms as well. However, the biggest goal would be to actually measure the rate of cellular respiration in terms of moles of glucose oxidized per second.

Mealworms and cellular respiration lab report

Finally by converting back into moles and using stoichiometry, we could get moles of glucose. We could then use the information from the graph to determine the number of moles of glucose oxidized in the ten minutes to finally obtain a quantitative rate of respiration.Measuring the Effect of Temperature on Mealworm Respiration Marie-Elena Cronin Kathleen McPhillips David Haas Experimental Design and Methods Results Room Temperature Cold Room Heat Lamps Methods Temperature Mealworms Heat Regulation Cellular Respiration Background Information and Objectives larval form of the .

Mealworms and cellular respiration lab report

The effect of increasing temperature on cellular respiration of mealworms 11 metabolic state and is positively correlated with the rate of the metabolic processes particularly with that of the cellular respiration.

FULL Final Lab Report. 11 pages. bio lab3 York University60%(5). Oct 30,  · The main point of conducting this lab was to find out if various factors affect the rate of cellular respiration in an animal.

Measuring the Effect of Temperature on Mealworm Respiration Marie-Elena Cronin Kathleen McPhillips David Haas Experimental Design and Methods Results Room Temperature Cold Room Heat Lamps Methods Temperature Mealworms Heat Regulation Cellular Respiration Background Information and Objectives larval form of the . The purpose of part two of the lab is to observe cellular respiration in animals, and in this case, mealworms. In part two, students measured the cellular respiration rate of mealworms by measuring their consumption of O2 in milligrams using the microrespirometers in water baths. Introduction The purpose of this experiment was to study the effects of ethanol on the cellular respiration of mealworms. Cellular respiration is the process by which cells harvest the energy stored in food. It is the intake of oxygen and energy in the form of glucose, and the cells ability to break it down into [ ].

In our case, we used mealworms. In order to measure the rate of respiration, we used a carbon dioxide sensor. Carbon dioxide is an essential product of cellular respiration.

The purpose of part two of the lab is to observe cellular respiration in animals, and in this case, mealworms.

In part two, students measured the cellular respiration rate of mealworms by measuring their consumption of O2 in milligrams using the microrespirometers in water baths. Jan 06,  · Nico explains his experiment that explores how temperature affects the metabolism of mealworms.

Mealworms were put in respirometers that were then placed into room temperature and cold water baths. Lab Report/Mealworms. study the effects of ethanol on the cellular respiration of arteensevilla.comar respiration is the process by which cells harvest the energy stored in food.

It is the intake of oxygen and energy in the form of glucose, and the cells ability to break it down into carbon dioxide, water, and energy required for the body to function.

Entry 6 – Mealworms Investigation Lab Report! | BiologyInteractiveNotebook